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Clinical Trial Information for Parents

Enrolling children in a clinical trial

Enrolling children in a clinical trial

Participating in a pediatric clinical trial is a very personal decision that is unique for every family. The videos below are presented to help parents make a decision about enrolling their child in a clinical trial.

How will my child benefit?

Children and parents are participating in something that may lead to advancements in treatments, and help other families and future generations.

Why is research with children necessary?

Why is research with children necessary?

Many drugs prescribed for children are based on research from adult clinical studies and physicians are challenged with adjusting the dosage for children. Most medications prescribed for children have not been tested with children.

Children are not little adults. Pediatric clinical studies help provide vital data so that children can be treated based on their special developmental needs.

One size does not fit all. Pediatric research can help uncover effective therapies for infants, children, and adolescents.

How do kids feel about clinical studies?

It’s essential for the research team, parents, and family members to hear the perspective of children as patients.

Including them in the conversation helps children take an active role in their clinical study. Depending on their age, these kids will have a lot to say!

It's important to foster an environment where children feel comfortable asking questions, talking about how they are feeling, and voicing any concerns.

Hear first-hand what children have to say about being in a study.

Your clinical study team

Your clinical study team

Many drugs prescribed for children are based on research from adult clinical studies and physicians are challenged with adjusting the dosage for children. Most medications prescribed for children have not been tested with children.

Children are not little adults. Pediatric clinical studies help provide vital data so that children can be treated based on their special developmental needs.

One size does not fit all. Pediatric research can help uncover effective therapies for infants, children, and adolescents.

See our FAQs to learn more

Information on Pediatric Clinical Studies is presented with permission from the National Institute of Health (NIH) Children and Clinical Studies program, designed to educate and empower parents on making informed decisions about enrolling their child within a clinical study. 

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